Re: help with German book

From: Christina Z. Anderson ^lt;[email protected]>
Date: 07/27/05-08:03:14 AM Z
Message-id: <008f01c592b3$f1720570$f83dad42@oemcomputer>

Thank you, Judy and Henk!
I think Judy is correct in assuming gamboge. The context of gummigutt is in
a list of colors to use for gum, as is krapplack. Both are recommended. I
for sure think krapplack is madder lake deep or some such, as it is under
the red category, and gummigutt is under the yellow category in Koester's
book.

BTW, chrome yellow is often recommended, so I think the old adage "you can't
use chrome colors" didn't seem to phase them at all. However, a caution was
said against certain colors, like Kremser white, that reacted with the
chromate to create lead chromate--a dirty color.

What is fun is when I get back my translation of a book, my German
translator, who doesn't know photography or chemistry, will transpose the
funniest words. For instance, one whole translation used the word "rubber
print" so obviously "gum" in German is rubber, too? And there is a word she
uses frequently--"copying"--that must mean, in context, "printing". Since I
get the general drift of the sentence it is usually not a problem, but when
I want to know specific chemical names or color names, then I get into a
snafu.

I start all French texts today. Boy do I have big ideas.
Chris

PS Katharine Thayer if you are reading this, do you have any interest in the
arguments that went on back in the day about what actually happened
chemically with the dichromate and gelatin? It is too lengthy to talk about
here, so I could send them to you if you give me your address offlist.
Info, of course, may not at all be current or correct, but you never know if
there is some tidbit lurking amidst the humorous backbiting.
----- Original Message -----

From: "henk thijs" <henk.thijs@hetnet.nl>
>>> anyone know what pigment "Krapplack" and "gummigutt" would be in
> I use from SCHMINCKE GOUACHE:
> Krapplack dunkel / madder lake deep / laque de garance foncee/lacca di
> garanza scura
>
>> Gummigut could be good gum, but according to my Cassell's New German
>> Dictionary it's gamboge.
Received on Wed Jul 27 08:03:37 2005

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