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power to the internet



-48VDC is extremely reliable, we have also never had a power incursion on our DC plant. Any of them. 

Iâ??m not sure Iâ??d consider it cheap, but itâ??s not horrifying expensive and it *works* when you deploy enough of it in a 2 or 3N fashion.

-Ben

> On Dec 28, 2019, at 9:04 AM, Baldur Norddahl <baldur.norddahl at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> What is wrong with lead acid battery backup? Seems to be exceedingly stable from my experience. We have all our equipment on -48V DC and have never had a power interruption at any site.
> 
> The requirements here are 48 hours of backup by law. Telecom is declared to be part of emergency and defense, so they put in a requirement for resilience. 
> 
> Regards 
> 
> Baldur 
> 
> 
> tor. 26. dec. 2019 11.33 skrev Joe Maimon <jmaimon at jmaimon.com>:
>> Unless telecom infrastructure has been diligently changing out the lead 
>> acid battery approach at all their remote terminals, powered gpon, hfc 
>> and antennae plants will never last more than minutes. If at all.
>> 
>> A traditional car has between a 100-200amp alternator @12volts
>> 
>> How much generating capacity can you get out of a typical hybrid?
>> 
>> Self-isolating and re-tieing inverters. Economic household ATS systems. 
>> Do those exist?
>> 
>> Enough independent distributed capacity and now comes the ability to 
>> create grid islands. How might that look?
>> 
>> Electric grid shortage is likely coming to NYC, courtesy of folk of 
>> certain political persuasion and their love of stone age era living. IP 
>> decommissioning.
>> 
>> If you have CO loop copper, keep it.
>> 
>> Joe
>> 
>> Don Gould wrote:
>> > This is a very short term problem.
>> >
>> > The market is going to fill with battery storage sooner rather than 
>> > later.
>> >
>> > Solar is just exploding.
>> >
>> > Your car will "house tie".
>> >
>> > 6G will solve your data problem.
>> >
>> > D
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > -- 
>> > Don Gould
>> > 5 Cargill Place
>> > Richmond
>> > Christchurch, New Zealand
>> > Mobile/Telegram: + 64 21 114 0699
>> > www. <http://www.tusker.net.au/>bowenvale.co.nz
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > -------- Original message --------
>> > From: Michael Thomas <mike at mtcc.com>
>> > Date: 26/12/19 2:33 PM (GMT+12:00)
>> > To: nanog at nanog.org
>> > Subject: power to the internet
>> >
>> >
>> > https://www.politico.com/news/2019/12/25/california-power-shutoffs-089678
>> >
>> >
>> > This article details some of the issues with California's "new reality"
>> > of planned blackouts. One of the big things that came to light with
>> > these blackouts is that our network infrastructure's resilience is
>> > pretty lacking. While I was (surprisingly to me) ok with my DSL
>> > connection out in the boonies, lots and lots of people with cable
>> > weren't so lucky. And I'm not sure how bad the situation is with
>> > cellular infrastructure, but I assume it's not much better than cable.
>> > And I wouldn't doubt that other DSL deployments go dark when power is
>> > down. I have no clue with fiber.
>> >
>> > So I guess what I'm wondering is what can we do about this? What should
>> > we do about this? These days IP access is not just convenience, it's the
>> > way we go about our lives, just like electricity itself. At base, it
>> > seems to me that network operators should be required to keep the lights
>> > on in blackouts just like POTS operators do now. If I have power to
>> > light my modem or charge in my phone, I should be able to get onto the
>> > net. That seems like table stakes.
>> >
>> > One of the things we learned also is that the blackouts seem to last
>> > between 2-3 days apiece. I happen to have a generator since I'm out in
>> > the boonies and our power gets cut regularly because of snow, but not
>> > everyone has that luxury. I kind of want to think that my router+modem
>> > use about 20 watts, so powering it up would take about 1.5kwh for 3
>> > days. a quick google look shows that I'd probably need to shell out $500
>> > or so for a battery of that capacity, and that's doesn't include your
>> > phones, laptops, tv's, etc power needs. What does that mean? That is a
>> > major expense for a lot of people.
>> >
>> > On the bright side, I hear that power generator companies stocks have
>> > gone through the roof.
>> >
>> > On the dark side, this is probably coming to a lot more states and
>> > countries due to climate change. Australia. Sigh.
>> >
>> > Mike
>> >
>> 
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