RE: Dry-mounting gum prints

From: Eric Neilsen ^lt;[email protected]>
Date: 05/05/05-06:58:51 AM Z
Message-id: <200505051258.j45CwdOu008862@spamf1.usask.ca>

Here is a novel idea, tell them what to do. You should not let a frame shop
do something for you, you should expect them to follow your instructions.
If they change the order; they redo it and pay for any damage to your art
work as a result of their failure to do as requested. Just like the correct
viewing detail, it is up to the artist to know what to do with their work to
get it framed. You can't rely on someone else to know what your work
requires. If you discuss your type of art work with them, you should be able
to tell if they know what they are doing. After all you should, it is your
work on the line.

Eric Neilsen Photography
4101 Commerce Street
Suite 9
Dallas, TX 75226
http://e.neilsen.home.att.net
http://ericneilsenphotography.com
 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kate M [mailto:kateb@paradise.net.nz]
> Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2005 4:32 AM
> To: alt-photo-process-l@sask.usask.ca
> Subject: RE: Dry-mounting gum prints
>
>
>
> Katharine Thayer wrote:
> >
>
> >
> > I had framed the print between two pieces of museum board hinged
> > together, the front board of course with a window cut out of it and
> > the back board solid. A piece of archival foam core was placed in the
> > frame, loose, behind the two pieces of museum board to back the piece.
>
> > The print was attached to the solid piece of museum board with linen
> > tape. I handed them the sandwich of museum board with the print
> > inside, and what I expected was that the print would be drymounted to
> > the solid piece of museum board to which it was already attached. But
> > instead, when the print came back the solid piece of museum board had
> > been discarded and the print had been mounted on a piece of foam core
> > that the frame shop had supplied. As I said, I was surprised by this.
>
>
> II can't say that I am surprised - if you think of the dumbest thing a
> shop could do and then multiply it by a further factor of dumbness, this
> is what they will do to your prints......
> I routinely have used foamcore (archival type) for silver gelatine but
> have always used museum board for gums (most of my prints if not all
> would have a fairly even gum coating). I wonder if the framed print was
> taking up moisture from the air and the light areas of the print were
> swelling?. That would be a worry to me.
> Kate
>
> --
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
> Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.11.0 - Release Date: 29/04/2005
>
Received on Thu May 5 06:58:58 2005

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.8 : 06/02/05-10:12:02 AM Z CST