Re: Kallitype Recipes

From: [email protected]
Date: 06/28/05-07:22:32 AM Z
Message-id: <10241.216.47.52.120.1119964952.squirrel@rhblade2.clemson.edu>

My experience is that coating and development of kallitype prints can be
done in the same type of low level tungsten illumination that we use with
other alternative processes such as gum, carbon, pt./pd. and VDB. I
personally use a 75 watt yellow bug light for coating and development, but
dry the coated paper in the dark. I have occasionally left the paper to
dry in the same room with the bug light, at a distance of 4-5 feet from
it, with no resultant sign of light fogging after 30-60 minutes.

Sandy King

> I have what may seem a really dumb question that I need to ask. I was
> prompted, by your posting below, to read your article and was so taken
> by it that I read the entire thing whilst having my breakfast tea BEFORE
> reading the papers.
>
> But I found myself asking a question: since the kallitype is a high
> UV-sensitive process, how much of this can be done in
> low-light/daylight? I was concerned about being able to evaluate coating
> coverage, stain clearing during development, etc.,
>
> I've done a fair bit of silver POP and recently discovered the Chicago
> Albumen Works papers, so after reading your article about kallitypes,
> I'm thinking this might be a good process for me.
>
> Thanks for your time,
>
> Dennis Moser
>
>
> sanking@CLEMSON.EDU wrote:
>>>Is kallitype as hard as it looks? I wanted to try kallitype and the more
>>> I
>>>read the more variations in the recipe I've found. Maddening. Why so
>>> many
>>>variations? Is there a simple starting point someone could give a
>>>beginner?
>>>Thx.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> Let me suggest that you have a look at my article on kallitype at
>> http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Kallitype/kallitype.html
>>
>> One of the main things I have tried to do with kallitype printing are,
>> 1)
>> simplify the process by limiting the variables, and 2) develop for
>> permanence, which dictates toning.
>>
>> If you process for permanence kallitype is no more complicated than
>> vandyke, but it is a lot more flexible because there is a very simple
>> system for controlling contrast in kallitype while in VDB you have
>> virtually no control. Very important difference if you print from
>> in-camera negatives. Also, it is much easier to obtain rich Dmax with
>> kallitype than VDB.
>>
>> Sandy
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> mailto:aldus@angrek.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> "That so few now dare to be eccentric, marks the chief
> danger of the time"
> --John Stuart Mill (1806-73)
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
Received on Tue Jun 28 07:22:46 2005

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.8 : 07/07/05-11:30:55 AM Z CST