[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

power to the internet



> How much generating capacity can you get out of a typical hybrid?

Youâ??re joking right?  A lotâ?¦ Enough to run an entire neighborhoodâ?¦   The Prius makes 50,000watts alone.

With the right circuitry, there is no need for power plants in the United States (save that theyâ??re more efficient than internal combustion gas engines in the 76hp range) - existing hybrid car stockâ??s generating capacity exceeds the entire US supply.  And itâ??s entirely untapped. 

Nissan just tested it for giggles, and found the Leaf (which has NO engine at all) can power a house for an entire week.  The batteries alone are a game changer, utterly transforming grids.

> Self-isolating and re-tieing inverters. Economic household ATS systems. Do those exist?

Yes I have a patent in one type of this this; it exists in numerous variants.

ATS-es for partial loads of up to 6,000watts are like $400.

You sound smart, but did you research any of this or just post?

-Ben.

-Ben Cannon
CEO 6x7 Networks & 6x7 Telecom, LLC 
ben at 6by7.net <mailto:ben at 6by7.net>




> On Dec 26, 2019, at 2:31 AM, Joe Maimon <jmaimon at jmaimon.com> wrote:
> 
> Unless telecom infrastructure has been diligently changing out the lead acid battery approach at all their remote terminals, powered gpon, hfc and antennae plants will never last more than minutes. If at all.
> 
> A traditional car has between a 100-200amp alternator @12volts
> 
> How much generating capacity can you get out of a typical hybrid?
> 
> Self-isolating and re-tieing inverters. Economic household ATS systems. Do those exist?
> 
> Enough independent distributed capacity and now comes the ability to create grid islands. How might that look?
> 
> Electric grid shortage is likely coming to NYC, courtesy of folk of certain political persuasion and their love of stone age era living. IP decommissioning.
> 
> If you have CO loop copper, keep it.
> 
> Joe
> 
> Don Gould wrote:
>> This is a very short term problem.
>> 
>> The market is going to fill with battery storage sooner rather than later.
>> 
>> Solar is just exploding.
>> 
>> Your car will "house tie".
>> 
>> 6G will solve your data problem.
>> 
>> D
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Don Gould
>> 5 Cargill Place
>> Richmond
>> Christchurch, New Zealand
>> Mobile/Telegram: + 64 21 114 0699
>> www. <http://www.tusker.net.au/>bowenvale.co.nz
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Michael Thomas <mike at mtcc.com>
>> Date: 26/12/19 2:33 PM (GMT+12:00)
>> To: nanog at nanog.org
>> Subject: power to the internet
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.politico.com/news/2019/12/25/california-power-shutoffs-089678
>> 
>> 
>> This article details some of the issues with California's "new reality"
>> of planned blackouts. One of the big things that came to light with
>> these blackouts is that our network infrastructure's resilience is
>> pretty lacking. While I was (surprisingly to me) ok with my DSL
>> connection out in the boonies, lots and lots of people with cable
>> weren't so lucky. And I'm not sure how bad the situation is with
>> cellular infrastructure, but I assume it's not much better than cable.
>> And I wouldn't doubt that other DSL deployments go dark when power is
>> down. I have no clue with fiber.
>> 
>> So I guess what I'm wondering is what can we do about this? What should
>> we do about this? These days IP access is not just convenience, it's the
>> way we go about our lives, just like electricity itself. At base, it
>> seems to me that network operators should be required to keep the lights
>> on in blackouts just like POTS operators do now. If I have power to
>> light my modem or charge in my phone, I should be able to get onto the
>> net. That seems like table stakes.
>> 
>> One of the things we learned also is that the blackouts seem to last
>> between 2-3 days apiece. I happen to have a generator since I'm out in
>> the boonies and our power gets cut regularly because of snow, but not
>> everyone has that luxury. I kind of want to think that my router+modem
>> use about 20 watts, so powering it up would take about 1.5kwh for 3
>> days. a quick google look shows that I'd probably need to shell out $500
>> or so for a battery of that capacity, and that's doesn't include your
>> phones, laptops, tv's, etc power needs. What does that mean? That is a
>> major expense for a lot of people.
>> 
>> On the bright side, I hear that power generator companies stocks have
>> gone through the roof.
>> 
>> On the dark side, this is probably coming to a lot more states and
>> countries due to climate change. Australia. Sigh.
>> 
>> Mike
>> 
> 

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://mailman.nanog.org/pipermail/nanog/attachments/20191226/85723502/attachment.html>