[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Snowden and Compilers



A few years ago some guys from Core security published a research were they
found laptop's BIOS with a tool called Computrace that supposedly was to
protect you if your computer was stolen, but contained a backdoor that
allowed remote access and code execution.

Computrace was installed in the BIOS for Notebooks of HP, Dell, Lenovo,
Toshiba, Gateway, Asus, Panasonic, and more.
No one can confirm it was the NSA yet... Snowden do you have something
about it in your collection?

Here is the paper
http://www.blackhat.com/presentations/bh-usa-09/ORTEGA/BHUSA09-Ortega-DeactivateRootkit-PAPER.pdf

Cheerz
http://apx808.blogspot.com


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 7:17 PM, Troy Benjegerdes <[email protected]> wrote:

> All the 'NDA'/proprietary/confidential information that goes with chip
> designs
> provide plenty of cover to insert backdoors.
>
> GCC would be a lot harder and people would be looking for it.
>
> But your USB chip, graphics card, hard drive, or two factor authentication
> token, on the other hand...
>
> The chinese are probably even copying the subverted chip designs without
> even knowing it's there.
>
> On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 02:47:01PM -0700, Kelly John Rose wrote:
> > I could see them more easily subverting chip designs themselves then
> trying
> > to subvert the entire compiler ecosystem.
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 2:05 PM, CypherPunk <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > On 02/11/2014 01:32 PM, Rich Jones wrote:
> > > > In all of the Snowden docs that have been released so far, has
> anybody
> > > > seen any mention of any NSA programs designed to subvert compilers?
> > > >
> > > > Compilers seems like an extremely prime target for manipulation, but
> as
> > > > far as I am aware there hasn't been anything mentioned about this
> yet.
> > > > Has anybody here heard anything that I haven't?
> > >
> > > Given that compilers are both a fairly easy to attack and amazingly
> > > convenient target, it wouldn't surprise me if the NSA has subverted a
> > > few specific compilers that are in common use. An attack of this nature
> > > has been hypothised since the early to mid-1980's. They would have to
> be
> > > amazingly dense not to have at least considered it.
> > >
> > > On the flip side, the NSA likes to do things where it has the least
> > > opportunity to be caught. Compiler subversion, while not "easy" to
> catch
> > > by any means, might offer too big a risk of being caught for them to do
> > > it. Being that they have a multitude of weirdly named programs
> > > specifically set up to compromise software, the evidence would lean
> > > towards they haven't done it but I'm sure it was, at the very least,
> > > discussed.
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Kelly John Rose
> > Toronto, ON
> > Phone: +1 647 638-4104
> > Twitter: @kjrose
> > Skype: kjrose.pr
> > Gtalk: [email protected]
> > MSN: [email protected]
> >
> > Document contents are confidential between original recipients and
> sender.
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://cpunks.org/pipermail/cypherpunks/attachments/20140211/b36dc7d7/attachment.html>