Re: A couple of questions.

From: kris ^lt;[email protected]>
Date: 07/05/05-11:22:16 AM Z
Message-id: <BAYC1-PASMTP04243DE558D2F096A77E5198E60@cez.ice>
Message-id: <42CAC1C8.3070708@eq-photo.com>

if you decide on something, try Kominek for quality used equipment; he
repairs the stuff before he resells it, and because it's a small
business, he's probably more willing to negotiate prices than, say,
Henrys (though don't quote me on that).

http://www.kominek.com/
and, for a taste,
http://www.kominek.com/pages/sales/lrg_frmt.php

ciao,
k

Don Bryant wrote:
> Ehud,
>
>
>>I am hoping to have about $ 5000 Canadian.
>>
>
>
> $5000 Canadian is roughly equal to $4026 U.S. and for that much money you
> can purchase a fine system.
>
> There are many camera choices you could make but I would recommend a good
> field camera over a Speed Graphic.
>
> I might even recommend a Kodak Master View with 8x10, 5x7 and 4x5 backs. You
> could then start with 4x5 and later have the option to shoot 5x7 and 8x10.
> KMVs are harder to find but they are out there and a good one will always
> maintain it's resale value. They seem to be going for about $1600-$1700
> currently in good condition with all three backs and good bellows.
>
> Take your time and shop around and ask questions of seasoned users. One
> great source for large format information is the Large Format Photography
> Forum found at
>
> http://www.largeformatphotography.info/
>
> Lots of articles and archives that you can search and read.
>
> Quality Camera in Atlanta is a good dealer for large format equipment, as is
> Mid-West Photo. You can call them both and get reliable help and quality
> products. KEH is an option for used equipment purchases, but their staff is
> less helpful (knowledgeable of LF) and they have smaller inventories of LF
> gear. Their equipment is fairly graded though and prices seem to be
> reasonable although not always the best.
>
> Good quality 4x5 film holders can be had for cheap on e-bay; look for the
> newer modern holders. Avoid the old highly used wooden ones. 10 holders is
> enough for a good start.
>
> Also think about the lenses you are interested in. If possible I prefer
> modern shutters that have 1/3 stop aperture marks - this usually means Copal
> shutters. Compurs are good too. The more time you spend researching lenses
> the better you will enjoy LF work.
>
> Just my 2 cents,
>
> Don Bryant
>
>
>
>
Received on Tue Jul 5 11:22:48 2005

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