RE: A slow train coming.

From: Ehud Yaniv ^lt;[email protected]>
Date: 12/24/04-01:21:57 AM Z
Message-id: <CGEDJMCFLPNOLHJABHCMKENAEKAA.eyaniv@telus.net>

Thanks for the suggestions. There are similar ones in a business book by
Vik Orenstein.

Ehud

-----Original Message-----
From: D. Mark Andrews [mailto:mark@dragonbones.com]
Sent: Thursday, December 23, 2004 5:32 PM
To: alt-photo-process-l@sask.usask.ca
Subject: RE: A slow train coming.

Two options which I've used are listed below. The second option is my
current situation. Good luck.

1. Find 2-3 folks and rent a darkroom space together. I did this for a year
or so and only paid $55.00 a month to share a darkroom space with three
other photographers. We rarely saw each other, but felt is was better to
have a larger space so two of us could work at once if desired--that almost
never happened. I live in San Francisco and it was easy to find two other
struggling photographers. We also found a darkroom already outfitted with a
sink so we rented it quickly. We all chipped in our equipment and sweat
labor to build drying screens and such. I found the other photographers
through a local online site for artists.

2. Share a studio space with a professional/commercial photographer. This is
my current situation. I pay a small amount of cash each month (under the
table) to an internationally recognized commercial photographer. In return,
I get exclusive use of the B&W darkroom (well, she loads film holders in
there--she shoots color transparencies), use of all her studio equipment
(minus lights and her cameras), and can shoot anywhere in the 3000 Sq Ft
space. The only hitch is that I can't be there when she is which is M-Th
during business hours. I have all evenings, three-day weekends, holidays
(she's currently on assignment in Europe for a month!). I have done some
shooting during the "non-allowed" days with easy negotiation. BTW, don't
think this deal is that unique, I've met several others who have similar
deals--it's costly for commercial photographer's to maintain studios so they
are always looking for ways to make the space more affordable. I found this
space through my local camera store advertisement board, but I've seen
similar spaces advertised on the local online art boards.

Both of these options assume you don't need a fulltime space. If you do,
they may not work for you.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Ehud Yaniv [mailto:eyaniv@telus.net]
Sent: Thursday, December 23, 2004 1:52 PM
To: Alt-Photo-Process-L
Subject: RE: A slow train coming.

Hi all,

The bathroom thing would work except that our apartment is very small and
the counters are non-existent. On top of that, we only have one bathroom
and I know my wife will need it at the most importune moment.

I guess I made is sound worse that it is. I can use the school darkroom at
the high school where I teach but I have concerns that some of my photos are
not ones I would like a student to come across when I am not there (or there
for that matter).

We will hopefully be buying a place this summer so there should be more room
to work at home.

Ehud

-----Original Message-----
From: SteveS [mailto:sgshiya@redshift.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 8:31 PM
To: alt-photo-process-l@sask.usask.ca
Subject: Re: A slow train coming.

Second that bathroom DR thing. Callahan used his bathroom for a darkroom
all of his career, and the school where he taught once in awhile.

S.
----- Original Message -----
From: <res1dvao@verizon.net>
To: <alt-photo-process-l@sask.usask.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 2004 7:35 PM
Subject: Re: A slow train coming.

> If you got that far you don't need to wait for a darkroom course and a
darkroom. If you can get a couple of chemicals, a tray, a light source,
paper and a bathroom, you can process what you have. Most of use got
started in the bathroom with a lot less than you have. A lot of people
still use a bathroom or a closet. Go for it.
>
> George
> >
> > From: Ehud Yaniv <eyaniv@telus.net>
> > Date: 2004/12/22 Wed PM 07:52:38 GMT
> > To: Alt-Photo-Process-L <alt-photo-process-l@sask.usask.ca>
> > Subject: A slow train coming.
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > It has taken a while but I have now finally made a digital negative for
> > silver printing. This is a test print as I am not set-up for alt
processes
> > but will have access to a darkroom.
> >
> > And let me tell you, being in Canada makes it much harder to do as many
> > materials need to come from the US. The Pictorico High Gloss White film
> > alone took 3 weeks.
> >
> > Anyway, I now have a negative to test but that will have to wait until
my
> > darkroom course starts in January.
> >
> > I again wanted to thank everyone who has helped and provided advice
here, on
> > APUG, and in personal email
> >
> > Ehud
> >
> > PS: To get this far I had to buy an Epson 1280, a Nikon Coolscan V ED,
> > upgrade Photoshop to CS, added 512 mb. ram, ordered both Mark and Dan's
> > books. Wow, a really slow train coming.
> >
> > _______________________________________________________________
> > When you hold the head of a snake the rest is nothing but rope.
> >
> > Akan (Ghana) Proverb
> > _______________________________________________________________
> >
> >
>
>
Received on Fri Dec 24 01:22:13 2004

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