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[ale] C on Linux



Master &;-) -

If you have the resources to set up X-Window, I found 'emacs' (not
'Xemacs') a much easier learning curve than command-line 'emacs', due to
[some] pull-down commands and full pull-down help invocation (Try the
"apropos" tool.) I admit this makes me a wimp.

I do use 'emacs' to compile and as a debugging shell for 'gdb'. The first
function will drop me in the source file for each compilation error (using
'ctags'). The second will walk through sources, even if they traverse
several languages: I've debugged mixes of 'C', FORTRAN, and 'Ada' from
source level, going up and down mixed-language call/return paths without a
hitch. As for editing, there is a useful sub-set of 'pull-down' menus,
but significantly more 'handwork' at the command line is required
(IMH[?]O).

Also, the command syntax of 'emacs' is a bit -err- 'quaint', but it's the
same as you work on 'C', 'C++', Ada, LaTex, SGML/HTML, and any other
languages with 'emacs' bindings. That's a _real_ "+" if you are working in
a number of media and a big reduction in "editor brain-bandwidth" load.

I know 'vi' is also integrated with 'ctags' for compilation, and possibly
for these other uses, but I'm not enough of a 'vi' user to comment on it.

On Mon, 11 Mar 2002, Charles Shapiro wrote:

> Uh, I use emacs to code in C here, although I generally go to the
> command line to test and do make(1). On a stock emacs distro, <ctrl>Z
> will put emacs in the background, so you can come back to it with fg (in
> bash) without reloading it from disk. This works with vi(1) as well.  I
> haven't bothered with syntax highlighting, but this .emacs file will
> make emacs format C code the way I like. You're welcome to examine and
> hack this file as you wish. To make it work, put it in "${HOME}/.emacs"
> (that is, the name ".emacs" in your home directory). If syntax
> highlighting is your heart's desire, you might wish to check out vim (
> http://www.vim.org/ ), which has a loyal -- some would say fanatical --
> following.
> 
> For myself, I gotta love an editor which has a Towers of Hanoi
> simulation (Meta-X-"hanoi"), an adventure game (Meta-X-"dunnet"), and a
> psychotherapist simulation (Meta-X-"doctor") buried inside it.
> 
> -- CHS
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Master Wizard [mailto:mainwizard at vei.net]
> Sent: Saturday, March 09, 2002 10:30 AM
> To: ALE
> Subject: [ale] C on Linux
> 
> 
> I am ready to start learning more about Linux and want to get into C on 
> Linux. I have several books on C and C++, but they gloss over any 
> platform specifics. I have a passing familiarity with vi and have looked
> 
> at emacs. I have also looked at some X based IDE's.
> 
> I would like to stay away from X as many of my systems are built on 
> older (486 and P1) hardware and X does not run well. I think emacs might
> 
> be the best choice, but I need to find some help with setting up and 
> using it for programming with C. Things like compiling, linking and 
> testing from emacs. Syntax highlighting, command completaion or anything
> 
> else it supports.
> 
> Any good books, websites or other resources for this type of
> information?
> 
> I have programmed with basic, C, Pascal and perl before and currently do
> 
> Java professionally. I am looking to expand my skills and need help with
> 
> the environment specifically, not programming in general.
> 
> Thanks,
> Ed.
> 
> 
> ---
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> 

-- 
 - John Mills


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